The Zine Machine is at Arapaki!

Image of the Zine Machine at Arapaki Library

Image of the Zine Machine at Arapaki Library

The Lucky Drop Zine Machine is back, this time you can find it at our Arapaki Manners Street branch! This little zine machine will be at Arapaki for the next eight months, before heading on to the next destination in its grand tour of our library branches.


Photo of Zine Machine

The Lucky Drop is a vending machine, run by the local zine organisation Wellington Zinefest, which sells zines made by local Wellington zine-makers. The zines are priced between $1 – $5, and are sold in A6 and A7 sizes. If you are interested in having your zines stocked in the machine, please contact Wellington Zinefest on their site: https://www.wellingtonzinefest.com/luckydrop

Every time the Lucky Drop changes location, it gets a shiny new look! This time it has been painted by Jewelia Howard (@glaciars), who has several of her zines for sale in the machine. Jewelia is an artist and creator based in Wellington. Her work is mainly focused on painting, drawing and digital creation, though she also enjoys experimenting with new mediums and trying different things. Jewelia is active in the New Zealand zine community and a member of the board of Wellington Zinefest. Her work mainly focuses on themes of nature, magic and folklore, with the occasional pop culture thrown in.”

Art by Jewelia Howard Painted on zine machine


As well as the Lucky Drop Zine Machine, Arapaki is also home to the largest zine lending collection in the Wellington City Library network. Our Newtown  and He Matapihi Molesworth Library branches also have zine lending collections. Our zines are free to borrow for three weeks, and can be renewed for another three weeks.

So what are you waiting for? Visit Arapaki today to read a zine or buy a zine! The Lucky Drop is the place to get your zine fix if you want to take them home forever!

 

New Zines!

The most recent Zinefest to be held in Wellington was in July. This time it was a one day event at the Wellington Faculty of Architecture and Design Innovation. Most of Wellington City Libraries lending zine collection is bought locally at Wellington Zinefests. So here are some selected highlights of zines purchased from the Winter Zinefest. They will be available for borrowing soon from the Arapaki Manners Street, He Matapihi, and Newtown branches.

There were several new zines from Zinefest regular, Jewelia Howard. They include a bright pink zine which reviews some of the Barbie Doll movies, and a zine of comfort movies, which lists Jewelia’s favourite “chick flicks”; and my personal favourite, “Hairy Styles”, an illustrated zine of Harry Styles’ hair styles, from 2011 – 2019.

Sally Bollinger also provided several new zines. “The Flat of Whimsy” is an illustrated collection of scenes from her flatting life. While “Menaces and Maledictions” is a cartoon about a vampire in early colonial New Zealand. Plus Bollinger wrote two zines about role-playing games (RPG), and Dungeons and Dragons: “The Adventure Zine” and “A Basic Handbook of our Players”, respectively.

RPG and Dungeons and Dragons was a theme at this year’s Winter Zinefest. @feydayarts has created an extremely fun “Choose Your Own D & D Character” with 12 possible endings. While well-known cartoonist, Dylan Horrocks, has “Secret Door”, a  whimsical zine about a role-playing game on nostalgia and memory.

Another prominent New Zealand writer and artist, Tara Black, was also there with several zines. There were two collections of live drawings done at the Auckland Writers’ Festival 2021, and Featherston Booktown 2021. Plus Black wrote two volumes of cartoon zines about Ana, who is a teenager who lives with her mother and sister. One day she wakes up to find two “Book Dragons” under her bed. They are obsessed with books, and they are actually badgers!

There were also zines featuring local content. David Tulloch’s zine, “Regurgitated Recipes”, which collects recipes from six old New Zealand cookbooks, going back as far as 1944. And also Andrew McCauley’s volume 1 of the “Wellington Grave Explorer’s Guidebook”. This first volume focuses on Karori Cemetery, and highlights the graves of prominent people in the organised labour movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. And finally, @Badbroidery has produced a cute zine for “cat lovers and the zodiac/ horoscope curious” which matches cute line drawings of cats with their zodiac traits.

Evening events at Arapaki Manners Library

Arapaki Library is starting up its early evening event series, providing competition and creation galore

Need some fun after a long day of work or study? Have time to kill waiting for your bus? Want to do something, but make it free? Maybe you have some creative energy to burn? If any of these apply, the Arapaki event nights are for you! The programmes are held in the early evenings at Arapaki Manners Library and are FREE, with all resources provided.

The events are on from 5 to 6:45pm:

Monday – Games Night
Tuesday – Zine Night
Wednesday – Chess
Thursday – Write Night
Friday – Silent Book Club

The event series is beginning on Monday, 29th of March and will be on every week. We look forward to seeing you there!

The Lucky Drop zine machine comes to Johnsonville

The Lucky Drop zine machine is now at Johnsonville Library! The Lucky Drop is a vending machine which sells zines made by local Wellington zine-makers. The zines are priced between $1 – $3, and are sold in A6 and A7 sizes.  The Lucky Drop is run by the local zine organisation Wellington Zinefest. If you are interested in having your zines stocked in the machine, please contact them on their site:
https://www.wellingtonzinefest.com/submissions

The Lucky Drop will be doing a tour of Wellington City Library’s branches and community centres, so look out for it around the city later this year. Each time it changes location the Lucky Drop gets a new design. Currently it features the talents of zine maker aappapappa. Visit the Lucky Drop at Johnsonville Library today!

New Zines!

The most recent Zinefest to be held in Wellington was in October 2020, and once again it was a big one. It was held over two days, this time at the Wellington Faculty of Architecture and Design Innovation, with different stallholders on both days. Most of our lending zine collection is bought at the Wellington Zinefests.

So where can you borrow our zines from? You can find them at three of our branches: Arapaki Manners Library, Newtown Library, and He Matapihi Molesworth Library at the National Library. Our zines are free to borrow for three weeks, and can be renewed for another three weeks.

Here are some selected zine highlights from the October 2020 Wellington Zinefest. These will be available for borrowing, so look out for them on our shelves.

Unsurprisingly, zines about quarantine and lockdown were a big theme this year: Miles Davitt created Quarantine Comix about the experience of being in quarantine in both Australia and New Zealand; Aotearoa: A Herd of 5 Million is exactly what its subtitle suggests: “a pictorial investigation into the collective consciousness of 21st century New Zealand (the farming colony)”; Humans in Lockdown is a satirical take on various personalities, and how they experienced lockdown, by Daniel Vernon; while Hamish Wilson’s An Airport Journal of remastered sketches has a section on Covid-19; lastly Els. continues her ongoing series Fancy Ladies Being Salty with a special lockdown edition as it applies to nineteenth century illustrations of fashion.

Another strong theme was zines about Wellington, and about birds in Wellington and New Zealand: Charlotte Page has written a small, short, black and white zine about being Gothic in Wellington, called Wellington Gothic; while David Coyle has written a collection of poems, a couple of which are devoted to Wellington, in Cuba Street and Other Poems. Catrina S. and James H. have collaborated on a tongue-in-cheek bird guide in their A Guide to Wellington Birds; while immigrant couple Zach Mandeville and Angelica Blevins have bravely created A Non-Native Guide to Native Birds.

Other themes include illustrated explorations of topics, such as death and sinning, by Davin Richardson in A Fright-ful Book About Death, and The Seven Deadly Sins respectively; and by Chantal Mcilraith in The Seven Deadly Stages of Procrastination. There were several delightful wordless, or nearly wordless, comics such as Moon Bandits, by Myrjam Van de Vijver, about an astronaut who finds that the moon is not as empty as she was expecting; and two about cats: Probable Claws by Chantal Mcilraith, about a very brave cat, and El Sueño del Gato by Abigail Sucsy, about what a cat gets up to at night while its person sleeps. There were also a couple of colouring-in books: Finding Karl by Eshant Gandhi, and Pigment of Your Imagination by Bhavya Ahuja.

Finally, we have a fanzine by Els. devoted to Carly Rae Jepson; Issue 4 of Overcommunicate, a “Magazine for LGBTQIA+ women, non-binary folk, gender diverse people, and friends”; Issue 73 of Incredibly Hot Sex With Hideous People by Bryce Galloway; a new instalment of Sock Review, this time reviewing the different options for supporting a broken ankle; and The Princess Bride told entirely in film stills and emojis by Willow Scarlett.

New locally made zine

The Archive is Alive: Exploring Aotearoa NZ’s Queer History is the latest zine added to our lending zine collection. Launched on Friday 2nd October 2020, it is a Wellington made zine based on the Lesbian and Gay Archives of New Zealand (LAGANZ), and reflects on the importance of local queer history. The zine contributors explored the LAGANZ archives as a group, and photocopied posters, leaflets, and photos of queer history and culture in Aotearoa. It was made as a collaboration between LAGANZ and Wellington Zinefest, with support from the Alexander Turnbull Library and Wellington City Council Creative Communities. 

For more info and related content check out our database Archives of Sexuality & Gender, it spans the sixteenth to the twentieth century and is the largest digital collection of primary source materials relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender. Highlights include New Zealand periodicals Pink Triangle and Out! New Zealand’s Alternative Lifestyle Magazine.

We want your zines!

Are you a zinemaker? Or perhaps you got creative during lockdown and made a quaranzine? Here at Wellington City Libraries we have lending zine collections at three of our branches: Newtown, Arapaki on Manners, and He Matapihi Molesworth Library. We are happy to take donations of zines for these collections, especially if you made a quaranzine during lockdown. A combination of “quarantine” and “zine”, quaranzines are creative expressions of people’s thoughts and feelings experienced during lockdown.

If you do want to donate a zine, then please drop your donation into any of our branch libraries. It will then get sent to be processed with our zine stickers and added into our catalogue, before joining the zine collection at one of our three libraries.

Zines come to Arapaki Manners Library

Our CBD branch, Arapaki Manners Library on 12 Manners Street, now has a zine collection! Zines are self-published and independently produced print publications. Zine (pronounced “zeen”) comes from the words “magazine” and “fanzine”. Zines come in many different shapes and sizes. They can be handwritten, or computer-printed, and are made by people of all ages. Zines come bound in different ways: some have bindings like books and even ISBN numbers, whereas others will be stitched or stapled together.

The zines are free to borrow, and are issued for three weeks, just like books! Most of the zines in Arapaki’s collection are brand new, and were acquired at the Wellington Zinefest held in November of last year. Nearly all the zines are written by local New Zealand authors and produced in New Zealand.

Our zines are loosely categorised into 6 topics identified by coloured dots on the covers: Comics are orange; Literature, such as poems and stories are green; Personal zines, about the author and their life, are blue; Art zines featuring drawings, photography, etc, are yellow; DIY zines about how to make or do things are black; and lastly, zines about politics, history, and everything else are white.

We also have zine collections at our Newtown and He Matapihi Molesworth branches. So check them all out and get borrowing today!

New Zines!

The last Zinefest in November was the biggest one to be held in Wellington so far. In addition to opening night festivities, the marketplace ran over two days at Te Auaha, with different stallholders on both days.

Zinefests in Wellington are normally held twice a year, and Wellington City Libraries always attends if possible. Most of our lending zine collection is bought at the marketplace. So where can you find zines now that the Central Library is closed? Our new zines are being added to Newtown Library’s collection. A collection has been based there for a while now, and Newtown is now the main source of lending zines for Wellington Library borrowers. So pop-in to Newtown to browse and borrow!

Here are some selected highlights from the November Wellington Zinefest, which will be available on Newtown Library’s shelves:

“Overcommunicate” is self-described as a “magazine for LGBTQIA+ women, non-binary folk, and friends.” Written by a variety of contributors, it is a collection of art, writing, and poetry. We have Issues 1 and 2 available to borrow.

The Crispin series. This is a set of four little zines about Crispin, a yellow, smiley-faced blob who goes on a series of adventures including: “Crispin goes fishing”, “Crispin has a series of close shaves”, “Crispin in Monday’s child”, and the “Beginners guide to drawing Crispin.” Each one is hand-coloured by the artist.

Three new zines by Willow Scarlett. Artist, writer, and learner of Latin, Scarlett has created three beautifully produced zines that combine art and writing. Their first, “Gutter Flowers volume 1” is an A5 sized, stitch-bound, black-matte covered zine with raised gold lettering. Inside are full-colour illustrations with more raised, textured lettering. The other two are A6 in size: “blood stained stairs”, and “death and beautiful illusions.” Both are short horror stories printed on thick red paper, and stitched together with gold thread.

Our final new zine was not bought at the zinefest, but was sent to us as a donation from Newtown School. It is called “Kids Write: A journal publishing awesome authors and artists.” We have Issue 1, which was produced in Term 3 of 2019. It features illustrations and writing from children aged 5 – 11.

Make n’ swap zines at the library

Create and swap zines and art at the library! On the last Thursday of each month we’re collaborating with Wellington Zinefest to create a space dedicated to zines. Make, swap, browse and chat with fellow zine enthusiasts for a couple of hours and get your creativity flowing. Materials will be provided, but feel free to bring your own along too. There are also plenty of power points and USB chargers to keep your phones and laptops charged, if you’re working digitally.

There is also a swap element – if you have zines you’d like to swap, bring them along and trade your creations. Swaps only, no sales.

You may also choose to donate your completed zines to the library, which people will then be able to browse and borrow! Find out more about our zine collection here.

Our first meet-up is this Thursday 26th July, from 6-8pm. See you there!

Zine make n swap poster

zine_carousel

Zines galore!

If you were part of our Zine workshops in July (see picture Gallery of the industrious crowd and amazing creations), you may have caught the zine bug and produced countless works of art & literature since. Do you know that we accept your zines in our collection? We are currently processing the last 6 month’s worth of donations which will soon be available on our shelves. Watch this space!

And don’t forget, Wellington ZineFest 2015  will be held on Saturday 28th November 12-5pm at Ivy Bar. Don’t miss this essential event in the creative Wellington calendar and find treasures and inspiration for your own zines. We will be getting some new zines for our collection, as always.

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Wellington Zinefest 2015!

This year’s Wellington Zinefest is this coming Saturday, and we can’t wait! We get loads of our library zine collection from vendors at Zinefest, so you can be sure to see a whole lot of new zines on our shelves in the following weeks.

The event is this Saturday, November 28th, from 12pm-5pm. This year it takes place at Ivy Bar, in the James Smith building basement, at the bottom end of Cuba Street. Don’t worry, it’s definitely an all-ages event! Watch out for the signs on the day, they’ll make sure you get to the right place.

You can learn more about the libraries’ zine collection over on the Zines page, and if you have any zines you’d like to donate to the WCL collection we will gladly receive them! Just drop your zines off at the Central library, or your local branch so they can be sent to the central collection. If you’re a Wellington zine maker, we’d love to get 2 copies of your zine so that we can preserve one in our heritage collection. Make sure to include your name, the name of your zine, year of publication, and any other relevant information with your zines, so that we can make them easily find-able for library borrowers.

We also have the option of making your zines available through Overdrive, one of our eLibrary services. We reckon this would be particularly great for poetry and writing zines, but if you have an image based zine you’d like added to Overdrive, that is not a problem. Plus, we provide this digitisation service for free! If you’re interested in making your zines available to WCL borrowers on Overdrive, send us an email at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

See you at Zinefest!

Zinefest poster

Zine Making Workshops for the Winter Zinefest

Zine Workshop sliderFor budding zinesters, we are very excited to announce a collaborative project to coincide with the Winter Zine Market that will be held on Saturday 18 July at the Thistle Hall (top of Cuba street)

Wellington City Libraries and well known local artist Kerry Ann Lee will be running a series of two Zine-Making workshops on Friday 17 July:
The afternoon session will take place at the Central Library (ground floor YA area) from 2.30-5pm, followed by an evening session at the Thistle Hall from 6.30-9pm.

Come and get inspiration from visual artist and zinemaker Kerry Ann Lee (who recently ran workshops at Te Papa  and Pataka Art + Museum), to create your own zine (check out our Zine blog here) from the myriad resources available at the library.

At the end of the first session, grab a bite in Cuba street and get some further inspiration from the city around you, as you make your way to the evening session at the Thistle Hall.

If you can’t join us for the afternoon session no problem, just turn up at the Thistle Hall for the 6.30pm start.

This is a FREE event. Although there is no need to book, it would be useful to tell us if you are intending to come on our Facebook Zine Workshops event page.

Library material and stationary will be supplied but you are welcome to bring your favourite supplies of pens, scissors & glue sticks!

Make this mid-July weekend a truly creative experience! Suitable for teens & adults.

UPDATE: Thank you everyone for your enthusiasm for these workshops! Please be aware that both venues have limited capacity so be sure to arrive on time to secure yourself a seat and a space to work 🙂

New zines! New zines! How do they get here?

Have you ever wondered how the zines in our collection make their way from the artists to our library shelves? Well, I hope you have because we’re here to dispel a little of the mystery! The particular zines in this haul were all bought from the 2014 Zinefest in Wellington, where our library zine coordinator Monty spends the day buying up loads of new zines for our collection. It’s an exciting time of year and a big job to get them all processed, but here it is recorded for you all!

First of all, here’s part of the huge stack of new additions:

Zines!

Our first step is to choose a zine. I liked the lettering and illustration on the cover of this one. Then we put a pink “zines” sticker and a barcode. All our zines get these stickers, regardless of what kind of zine they are.

2 3

Here’s Steph using a super fancy barcode ruler (it’s a piece of paper) to measure where the barcode should go so that our scanners will be able to read it. This was a big job so as you can see, we needed snacks!

3a
This picture features my own zine, Sock Review!

Next, if it’s a zine by a New Zealander, it gets this koru sticker. You’ll see these stickers all throughout our collection indicating NZ authors.

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Next we have to decide what kind of zine we’re processing. The categories we put our zines into are literary, personal, DIY, arts, comics and miscellaneous. Because this zine contains interviews with musicians, I put it into the “arts” category.

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After that, we manually input the zine data into our spreadsheet. You can find that spreadsheet over on the Zines popular topic page, and you can search the document for title and author if you’re looking for something specific!

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And then the zine goes onto the shelf! Most go on this shelf at Central, but some go to our zine collection at Newtown Library instead. Then we just have a hundred or so more zines to do this for!

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You can find a bunch more information on our zine collection over at the Zines popular topic page.

Zinefest 2014: (Secret) Mobile Art Print Space!

Follow the shiny shelves and wiggling wheels of this mobile art print space as it winds its way secretly around some of the capital’s most magical art locations. Stacked to the brim with a curated collection of delightful zines, artist books and exhibition catalogues you’ll need to ‘like’ Zinefest on Facebook and follow on Twitter to find out where to catch a glimpse of this trundling treasure!

Mobile Zine Library

Venue: Disclosed via facebook.com/wellingtonzinefest but pssst – we’ll be hosting the print space at Central library from today until Monday 17th November! After that, you will need to follow Zinefest updates (or click “going” on the Mobile Art Space Facebook event) to find out where else it will be going in the leadup to this year’s event, which is approaching fast!

Wellington Zinefest 2014 will be held on Saturday 22 November at James Cabaret, 5 Hania Street in Mount Victoria. We can’t wait!

Amazing Zine Artwork Made By Kids

As a shout out  to our free kids Zine making workshop this coming Saturday here are some examples of Zine artwork and covers made by Zora, Oki and Dune Patrick, our workshop hosts and Zine makers. Materials and session provided by Wellington Zinefest and Wellington City Libraries.

HOW TO MAKE A ZINE WORKSHOP – BY KIDS FOR KIDS

This Saturday 18 October at Central Library,
65 Victoria Street, 10.30am – 12noon.

DunewebzineswebZora4webZora1web

How to make a zine – by kids for kids

If you know or have any kids that would like to try out making a zine, then looky here…

How to make a zine - by kids for kids

Come along to the free children’s zine workshop and have a go at making your very own zine!

Thirteen-year-old Zora Patrick has been making zines for almost five years. In 2011 she won Wellington Zinefest’s ‘Best of the Fest’ trophy, and in 2012 was invited to the 2012 KOMACON (children’s comic competition) in Bucheon, Korea.

Zora and her zine-making younger sisters Oki (9) and Dune (8), whose work was also recently included in the exhibition Small Press at RAMP Gallery in Hamilton, will be talking about ideas for zines, zine-making techniques, and presenting some of their favourite creations.

This workshop aims to encourage children to participate in zine-making and introduce them to Wellington Zinefest, and will include a session of zine-making with materials provided by Wellington Zinefest and Wellington City Libraries.

When: Saturday, October 18, 2014, 10:30am – 12pm
Where: Central Library, 65 Victoria St, Wellington
Audience: Children
Cost: free!!

Spanish zines!! –

We were recently donated a massive pile of zines, so to celebrate (and get them all processed) we had a tea party zine processing meeting.

zinesparty

We got soooo many cool new zines. We have a bunch of new favourites, which we’ll blog about real soon. But for now, I want to show you our brand new Spanish zines:

spanishzines

Thanks to this kind donation from a zine maker in Spain, we have now have some new zines in Español! If you’re a library regular, you’ll know that we have a lot of foreign language books – maybe we could start developing a foreign language zines collection, as well? Come check them out! Viva la library!*

*not accurate Spanish.

Khartoum Place – an interview with Frisson

How did you get into making zines?
I got into making zines years ago as a way to promote live music shows. I hand-drew the zines on A4 pages, photocopied them (black and white), and folded or cut and stapled them into tiny booklets. Sometimes I also gave them out in little goodie bags at the shows. This time around I got into zine-making for different reasons. I started writing short stories late last year, and after a couple of months went by without anyone publishing them I decided to start publishing them myself! These days I’m still illustrating the zines, but I’m getting them made through Blurb rather than having to do all that photocopying and stapling. Since I released my first zine I have had a story or two published, but I still intend to release a zine every 2 – 3 months, and I’m currently working on the illustrations for my second one.

Can you give us a short bio about you?
I studied creative writing at Victoria University’s Institute of Modern Letters. I love cats and coffee.

We have read the zine Khartoum Place and loved it. In your words could you please explain to us why you decided to make it and publish it?
Thank you! I have discovered that I really enjoy weaving local, historical elements into my stories. Khartoum Place is a dark but loveable little square in Auckland’s CBD. The square’s mural, an admittedly slightly homely but very historically important memorial to women’s suffrage, is constantly under threat from people who think it’s ugly and want to remove it. The idea of an art historian trying to save the mural, her career and her love affair came to me in a flash while I was waiting for someone to turn up to a work meeting one day.

Once it was out there, did you get any unexpected reactions?
I posted it off to what seemed to me to be New Zealand’s major libraries. I didn’t have any idea what to expect. I’m thrilled that the Wellington and Christchurch Libraries have been in touch, but I’m a bit disappointed in Auckland Library. I keep sneaking in to see if I can find it their zine collection, but I haven’t seen it in there so far…

I also started a Facebook page and a website, and I’ve have some really nice comments coming through from those.

You say your zines are a New Years resolution, can you tell us a little bit more about that?
I’d been writing stories for a while and not getting them published, and the news had broken about Sport losing it’s funding, and I literally woke up on New Year’s Day and thought “I’m going to start a new journal!” So I sat down and mapped out my first issue, and it looked great! But then I thought, ‘wait a minute, this is a lot of work on top of a full time job, and I’m putting myself in a curatorial role and not actually doing what I enjoy, which is writing stories and drawing pictures’. So I decided to start a series of zines under the name Frisson.

What’s on your zine to-do list?
I intend to release a new issue every 2 – 3 months. But most importantly I’d like to connect with other zine makers, so I’m looking forward to checking out a Zine Fest or two.

What would you say to other zine makers?
I wasn’t sure how people would react to the fact that I got my zines made through Blurb rather than laboriously hand-crafting each one. That kind of carry-on was fine for me back when I was working part time in vintage stores and playing in bands. Now that I’m a wage slave getting up at 5.30am in the morning in order to find the time to write stories, I highly recommend outsourcing the production side (unless of course that’s your passion).

Do you have any music/zines/blogs recommendations?
Yes, I really like the New Zealand zine review. They’ve introduced me to all sorts of amazing things.

I’ve also found your blog really helpful. My next zine will have an ISBN number!

Wellington Zinefest 2013

Poster by Hayden Currie
Poster by Hayden Currie

Wellington Zinefest is only two weeks away now and as the first public library in New Zealand to have a zine collection we’re really excited. It’s not just about the main event though, there is a zinesational, extensive public program leading up to the BIG DAY, including:

Monoprinting for Zines – November 8 @ 6pm
Monoprinting is a fast and flexible way to introduce colour, design and expressive linework to your zines. You will get to try a range of monoprinting techniques that you can easily use at home – no printing press or expensive paper required. Learn how to add spot colour to B&W covers and pages, create one off or repeat prints and utilize patterns, lettering and stencils.

Materials supplied but do bring along imagery and zine ideas for inspiration and different paper types to trial. And wear old clothes!

Workshop limited to 6 people. To book, email: treasonous.pastimes@gmail.com

Demystifying the ISBN: A panel talk – November 14 @ 5:30pm
Librarians love zines. Librarians love zines with ISBNs even more.

We invite Amy Joseph (the National Library), Monty Masseurs (Wellington City Libraries) and Claire Harris (zine-maker) to talk us through why an ISBN is useful, and how to get one.

The librarians will also cover useful topics including the pre-publication cataloguing service, legal deposit and public lending rights for nz authors.

@ the Pipitea Seminar Room, National Library

Getting the Party On: DIY bunting & cardboard letters – November 15 @ 6pm
The festival is just around the corner (next week!) and we need your help to make the festival look, well, festive.

Expect materials to include many wondrous, colourful things!

@ Matchbox Studios

Zine Maker Talks – November 22 @ 6pm
Pens down, folks. Let’s kick back and remind ourselves why we make zines: to meet cool people & learn cool things.

Our line-up of speakers are all cool people, wanting to share cool things with you (watch this space, updates coming).

We hope you can join us.

@ Matchbox Studios

Fresh Zine Times

#zinefest Woah, it’s a blog in two halves! At the top is Wellington Zinefest build-up news and a bit further down are some sweet new zines from the zines-stand.

Make Time To Make Zines
Make Time To Make Zines #2:
Friday the 25th October, 6-8pm Matchbox and Wellington Zinefest present an anti-procrastination workshop to get your Zines happening. Read more.

Hand-crafted reviews for your zine-reading pleasure:The Play-Along-Songbook
The Play-Along-Songbook: Number One: Wellington:
“Just like having famous friends this Play-Along-Songbook lets you pretend-jam with very real Wellington musicians. Some of the muso’s on the bill are Seth Frightening, Wet Wings, & party all star Disasteradio. Bop bop diddy bop.” (Staff review)

Headphones With No Music

Headphones With No Music: “Real-life observations from aboard Wellington’s public transport system. Experience the journey and the weirdness. Companion tumblr.” (Staff review)

Hoarding Since The 90'sHoarding Since The 90’s: “A pocket-sized flashback of 90’s pop culture icons. It features bugs bunny doing the splits, and a jigglypuff playing pika-chu boo. Sweet!” (Staff review)

DIY Book Art Working Bee: @MatchboxWgtn #zinefest

To view the book art collection available from the library (including our favourite: “The Repurposed Library“) click here.

DIY Book Art Working Bee
DIY Book Art Working Bee

As part of the festivities in the run up to Wellington Zinefest Matchbox will be hosting a book art working bee! Matchbox will be creating a very special window display that will run for one month and they want your help!

Come along and learn how to make some super cool hanging book art, get to see your master piece inthe  window display then take it home to decorate your house once the display is finished. The window will not only look wonderful, it will also be promoting New Zealand made and independent Zines & Books.

Matchbox will provide some books for you but would love it if you have any old redundant books at home that you can donate to the project.

Free to come along and all welcome!

Make Time To Make Zines #1

Matchbox and Wellington Zinefest Presents….

MAKE TIME TO MAKE ZINES #1

Got an idea for a zine, but have just been too tired/busy/distracted to get started? PROCRASTINATE NO MORE.

Make Time to Make Zines#1 is the first of three workshops to get your zines happening. Each session will be two hours for you to work on whatever you want to work on, at whichever stage your zine is at. Stay as long as you like, and work as hard as you like.

We invite all zine-makers to make a time with themselves to sit down and make those zines happen!

We’ve booked the space. We’ve set the dates. We’ll even provide basic stationery, pens, etc. Koha entry for our lovely venue partner, Matchbox Studios.

Bring your lovely selves and zine ideas!

This Friday 11th October, 6-8pm All Welcome

Facelift!

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Hey hey!! If you’ve been into central library lately, you may have noticed that our zines have moved – they’re now parked straight in front of the arts, music and literature desk on the first floor!! So we decided it was time to give our display a wee facelift, befitting its sweet new central locale.

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We also have some rad new zines:

photo_1Riff Raff no.07, edited by Emily Jane Russell
This zine focuses on supporting and documenting emerging artists in the Waikato.  It is soooo beautifully put together and is full of glorious things – gorgeous pictures and photographs, and this issue also features boutique jewellery, a children’s clothing range and an illustrator, amongst other pretty things. So if you are from the Waikato, or are a crafter, or simply enjoy looking at beautiful, locally-made things – check out this zine!! You will love!

photo_2extra curricular 12, edited by Ellie Smith
The latest edition of extra curricular has just hit my hot little hands and I am in Love!! Yes, with a capital L! Full of the usual extra curricular deliciousness, I recommend you have a (long, slow) read.

Check out the newness!! Also, remember that we accept zine donations. If you have made your own zine and would like to contribute it to the WCL zine collection, drop it off at the arts, music and literature desk at central and we’ll add it to the collection. Promise!

Zines time

Somewhat embarrassingly, this is our first post this year on the zines blog. Hmm. But anyways! Please don’t consider this to be a lack of enthusiam; in fact, quite the opposite! We have been slogging away and have finally finished processing the hoard of sweet local zines we nabbed at the most recent ZineFest. So far, these have been my faves:

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Twin Lullaby by Charlotte Forrester
This wee zine is sooo beautifully put together. (Okay, I admit it – am a total sucker for pieces of paper tied together with string. Swoon!) It’s essentially a poem in five verses, and is accompanied by beautiful watercolour art works. There is also a really sweet touch on the final page – check it out.

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Not Afraid of Ruins #3 by Nausea Nissenbaum
This zine is a kind of travel diary with a difference. I love hearing people’s travel stories – I especially love hearing about far-flung countries I’ve never ventured to, and possibly never will. If this sounds like your bag, I definitely recommend this zine. You can read about loads of different European locales, and it also has other random bits and pieces, like book recommendations! Get in.

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Extra Curricular issue 11, edited by Ellie Smith
I can’t help but continue the Extra Curricular love. It’s just so cool. And pretty! Beautifully put-together. This issue is dedicated to new beginnings, and introduces a host of interesting folk who have, in some way, had exactly that. This issue also has tips for crafters who are pondering starting a business from their hobby or passion. As per, this edition is crammed with other interesting bits and is an exceedingly pleasant way to kill a couple of hours! Tea and cake to accompany, optional.

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Nowhere Land by Stolen
As the first page of this zine states, eveything in it is stolen from facebook. While I’m not totally down with the method, I have to say, it has made for a pretty sweet zine! It is entirely made up of images, some kinda banal and some kinda awesome. Definitely worth a flick.

We also have loads of sweet new international zines. I have been enjoying these:

thisisportlandThis is Portland by Alexander Barrett
This zine is fun, and, not surprisingly, is aaaaall about Portland. Loaded with interesting points and things you learn about a city only by living there, it has made me want to visit! With its manky weather, famous food, abundance of coffee and a multitude of bands, it actually sounds kinda similar to Wellington… This may or may not be true… anyone out there that’s travelled both cities and knows? (image supplied by microcosmpublishing.com)

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Barefoot and in the Kitchen by Ashley Rowe
Vegan recipe book! Zine style! What’s not to like? “With an emphasis on demystifying veganism and taking the intimidation out of cooking”, it helps makes cooking easy and way more fun. The Beaver Casablancas recipe is a highlight. (image supplied by microcosmpublishing.com)

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Fix your Clothes by Naleigh Briggs
I love a practical zine (that’s not to say that I dislike impractical ones – keep ’em coming!) and this one is awesome. The cover is super cute, as are the text and the illustrations inside. And best of all, it contains information we all need! Step-by-step instructions accompanied by clear illustrations, you’ll be darning your own socks in no time. Booya! (image supplied by microcosmpublishing.com)

New zines!

So little time, so many awesome zines. I’m hoping to have a bit more time over the holidays to do some proper zine reading – but for now here are a few zines that I’ve been excited about lately.

play-a-long songbookThe Play-A-Long Songbook: Number One: Wellington by Isobel Cairns, with transcriptions by Mark Turner

Hello this is a great idea! The Play-A-Long songbook (but we’re calling it a zine just because) is a lovingly produced A4 compendium of radness. It compiles lyrics, chords and melodies for five songs from some of Wellington’s best known artists – Disasteradio – Wet Wings – Secret Knives – The Sing Songs (with our very own 2nd floor librarian Jeremy!) – Seth Frightening. Also features awesome drawings by one of our favourite zine authors Isobel Cairns.

extraExtra Curricular (issue 10) edited by Ellie Smith

Merry Christmas! The newest issue of Extra Curricular has hit the zine shelves. Each issue has a theme and issue 10 encourages you to dip your toes into the whole self sufficiency thing. I had a completely lovely time listening to some tunes and browsing through its pages full of stories of regular* type folk creating and doing such inspiring (and yes, self sufficient) things, like – soap making, beer brewing, bread baking, fashion designing, herbal medicine concocting and beekeeping. Beekeeping looks awesome btw, we should so do that! I could live in Extra Curricular. It is good for the soul.

* regular not in a boring way, but in a hey, you can probably maybe one day do this sorta way

christchurch zineChristchurch Post Earthquake Reaction: Zine Expression by Jennifer Holdaway

I’ve been meaning to share this zine since it came across our desks a few months ago. It thoughtfully brings together photographs of the aftermath of the Christchurch Earthquake with a few carefully chosen poetic words and phrases. To me these collages really expressed both the sadness and emptiness that must be felt by the Christchurch people but also conveyed a real sense of emerging hope. Simple and heartfelt, this zine also includes a beautiful ‘wrap around’ poem by Jennifer.

Some zines lately….

Hello, it’s been a while but here are some zines I’ve been reading lately.

survival guide to being social 1Epitaph for my heart: a survival guide to being social, number four by amandapandajapanese

Reading this zine, I found myself nodding in agreement several times. The author describes many situations that will be common to the non-social among us and gives some useful advice. The accidental blank (not to be confused with ‘the blank’ – a form of social abuse), selective and deliberate Alzheimer’s (where you are constantly confronted by people who don’t remember your name), inane questions (usually about your love life and usually from relatives) and eyeballing (when a stranger looks you up and down with no indication of approval or civility) are all covered in some detail.

TinkerbellTinkerbell is missing (again): one cat’s tale of adventure by The WaterBear Appreciation Society

From the award winning team behind the Neighbour Cats zine, comes a heartbreaking but ultimately uplifting zine following the journey of local cat Tinkerbell. The story is told through filiers delivered to the author’s letterbox and covers multiple disappearances and reunions spanning years.

powered milk 1Powdered Milk, volume 5 by Keiler Roberts

Keiler Roberts parenting comic is a sweet yet realistic look at life as a new mother. From Microcosm Publishing: “In volume five Keiler navigates the strange and parasitic worlds of depression and insomnia. She also tackles the touchy subject of public breastfeeding and deals with calm-baby-envy at a MCA comics art show. Powdered Milk is a refreshingly candid and oft-times hilarious look at juggling life as a working artist and the increasing demands of motherhood (and the resulting mental strain).” See more of Keiler’s work here.

fieldtripThe Field Trip to Nowhere by E.Rodda

This is a lovely little zine of handwritten thoughts and poetry, accompanied by delicate illustrations. What also struck me was the dedication “This book was written for Zora Patrick. I read her zine at lunch time on the library carpet, it took me faraway from the library carpet and reminded me that making things thoughtfully is a good thing.”

Needless to say we library zine people love this sort of story!

New zines – Carla’s picks

Beloved by e.s. Fletschinger

Beloved is a comic’s zine about a grandpa who has just lost his partner. He’s sad and lonely, and getting used to his new life. This zine is really nice because it feels so real. It is a bit sad, but it does have a happy ending. Make sure you come to the library and check it out. It’s quite touching.

A rough guide to bicycle maintenance.

This is the famous DIY Portland based  zine on how to take care of your bike. The zine introduces you to bike-shop-politics, bike parts identification, how to fix a flat, an intro to the tools you will need, brake basics and further literature on repairs and maintenance. This zine is awesome because it is super useful! If you learn some new tips on how to fix your bike you can save lots of cash.

Obsessive consumption: what did you buy today? by Kate Bingaman Burt.

Kate is a really talented illustrator besides being an obsessive consumer. In this cute little zine you will fine drawings of Kate’s daily new acquisitions. This zine is cute funny. You can check out her drawing style here.

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